Kathy Pain (Reading) Alpha ++ cities are cities most integrated with the global economy: Alpha + cities are highly integrated cities, filling advanced service needs: Beta level cities are cities that link moderate economic regions to the world economy and are classified into three sections, Beta +, Beta, and Beta − cities. Manuel Castells University of Southern California Name the world's "alpha global cities" according to the Globalization and World Cities Study Group (2012). Alpha level cities are linked to major economic states and regions and into the world economy and are classified into four sections, Alpha ++, Alpha +, Alpha, and Alpha − cities. profile of Globalization and World Cities Research Network from the Yearbook of International Organizations, a service of the UIA. Christof Parnreiter (Hamburg) Welcome to GaWC - the leading academic thinktank on cities in globalization, The World According to GaWC       GaWC Books. It is based in the geography department of Loughborough University in Leicestershire, United Kingdom. Michael Hoyler (Loughborough) Alpha cities are the primary nodes in the global economic network. The cities in the 2020 classification are as follows.[4]. You can navigate through GaWC in two ways. Globalization and World Cities Research Network Welcome to GaWC - the leading academic thinktank on cities in globalization The World According to GaWC GaWC Books Sir Peter Hall University College London Ten cities on the Chinese mainland rank within the first 100 on "The World According to GaWC: City Classification for 2020", a research report released by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) on Aug. 21. Relations between cities have been neglected by world cities researchers; the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) Research Network has been formed to aid in rectifying this situation. Either use the links above to go straight to the content pages that interest you; or use the Gateways to see a selection of resources appropriate to your particular needs. It is a very important classification for investors and the economy at the global level. Sufficiency level cities are cities that have a sufficient degree of services so as not to be overly dependent on world cities. Relations between cities have been neglected by world cities researchers; the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) Research Network has been formed to aid in rectifying this situation. Peter Taylor (Northumbria), Associate Directors Today the network operates as the leading thinktank on cities in globalization and has diversified into related subjects where concern for inter-city relations intersects with research on issues concerning, for instance, international business, sustainability, urban policy, and logistics. Zachary Neal (Michigan State) Frank Witlox (Ghent) Saskia Sassen Columbia University The 2004 rankings added several new indicators while continuing to rank city economics more heavily than political or cultural factors. Allan Watson (Loughborough) Honorary Founders Many factors are taken into account in this analysis, including cultural and political influence, although economic factors are the most important consideration. The GaWC network for producing and disseminating knowledge of cities in globalization operates at several levels: There are the general users of our website: according to ClustrMaps our website annually attracts about 50,000 hits across over 150 countries, There are followers of @GaWC on Twitter: these numbered over 5000 at the last count, There are contributors to the website: over 280 scholars of whom some 250 are authors of GaWC Research Bulletins, There is a GaWC team of key researchers who have developed, maintain and are taking the GaWC research programme forward, In addition there are GaWC research fellows, younger scholars working on current GaWC themes. John Friedmann University of British Columbia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globalization_and_World_Cities_Research_Network [1] Together with Jon Beaverstock and Richard G. Smith, they create the GaWC's bi-annual categorization of world cities into "Alpha", "Beta" and "Gamma" tiers, based upon their international connectedness.[2]. Martijn Burger (Rotterdam) This is sorted into High Sufficiency cities and Sufficiency cities. David Bassens (Brussels) We are proud to be part of the global intellectual commons - please explore! The Globalization and World Cities Research Network, commonly abbreviated to GaWC, is a think tank that studies the relationships between world cities in the context of globalization. Globalization and World Cities Research Network official website, Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology, Globalization and World Cities Research Network, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Globalization_and_World_Cities_Research_Network&oldid=987711453, Short description is different from Wikidata, Wikipedia articles needing clarification from October 2020, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 8 November 2020, at 19:47. Jon Beaverstock (Bristol) The GaWC examines cities worldwide to narrow them down to a roster of 307 world cities, then ranks these based on their connectivity through four "advanced producer services": accountancy, advertising, banking/finance, and law. GaWC was founded by Peter J. Taylor in 1998. Gamma level cities are cities that link smaller economic regions into the world economy and are classified into three sections, Gamma +, Gamma, and Gamma − cities. James Faulconbridge (Lancaster) Beyond the categories of "Alpha" world cities (with four sub-categories), "Beta" world cities (three sub-categories), and "Gamma" world cities (three sub-categories), the GaWC cities include additional cities at "High sufficiency" and "Sufficiency" level. GaWC was founded by Peter J. Taylor in 1998. The world according to GaWC is a city-centred world of flows in contrast to the more familiar state-centred world of boundaries. The GaWC examines cities worldwide to narrow them down to a roster of world cities, then ranks these based on their connectivity through four "advanced producer services": accountancy, advertising, banking/finance, and law. The 2008 roster, similar to the 1998 version, is sorted into categories of Alpha world cities (with four sub-categories), Beta world cities (three sub-categories), Gamma world cities (three sub-categories), and additional cities with High sufficiency or Sufficiency presence. Although the world/global city literature is premised upon the existence of world-wide transactions, most of the research effort has gone into studying the internal structures of individual cities and comparative analyses of the same. [3] The GaWC inventory ranks city economics more heavily than political or cultural factors[why?]. Created in the Geography Department at Loughborough University, this network focuses upon research into the external relations of world cities. The following cities were included in the 2018 edition, but not in the 2020 edition: Added in the 2020 edition of the classification. It is based in the geography department of Loughborough University in Leicestershire, United Kingdom. Sir Nigel Thrift University of Warwick, Director Cities are categorized as Alpha, Beta or Gamma cities based on their connectivity to the rest of the world. Ben Derudder (Ghent) John Harrison (Loughborough) The research assesses cities in terms of their advanced producer services using a model called "interlocking network". The Globalization and World Cities Research Network, commonly abbreviated to GaWC, is a think tank that studies the relationships between world cities in the context of globalization. Either use the links above to go straight to the content pages that interest you; or use the. Email GaWC, You can navigate through GaWC in two ways. Xingjian Liu (Hong Kong)